Lucky-Mojo-Home-Page-Icon
Home
Page
Lucky-Mojo-Forum-Icon
Read Our
Forums
Lucky-Mojo-Join-Newsletter-Icon
Join Our
Newsletter
Lucky-Mojo-Hoodoo-Rootwork-Hour-Radio-Show-Icon
LMCCo.
Radio Show
This online presentation of
The Lucky W Amulet Archive by catherine yronwode
is sponsored by the

LUCKY MOJO CURIO CO.

6632 Covey Road, Forestville, California 95436
voice: 707-887-1521 / fax: 707-887-7128

email: order@luckymojo.com
Open 7 Days a Week, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Pacific Time
Icon-for-the-Hoodoo-Heritage-Festival-Workshops-Sponsored-by-Missionary-Independent-Spiritual-Church-in-Forestville-California
Hoodoo
Workshops
Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-Facebook-Page-Icon
Be a Fan:
Facebook
Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-Complete-Inventory-Icon
Complete
Inventory
My-Lucky-Mojo-Shopping-Cart-Icon
View Your
Cart
Pookline

SILVER DIMES

(MERCURY DIMES)

In folk magic, images of money are often used in spells to draw more money or a "lucky" coin is carried to attract financial good fortune. The near-universal use of this symbolism one includes the money bag charm, found in cultures as diverse as China, Europe, and the United States. Silver coins have been popular in European magic rituals from Medieval times onward. Encased coins, rolled coins, and specially-made good luck tokens are carried as lucky pocket pieces in many parts of the world, but in the United States, when it comes to standard-issue money, tradition dictates that the luckiest greenback is the rare $2.00 bill, and the luckiest coin is the silver dime.

European charms utilizing silver coins sometimes call for filing a mark such as an "X" on the coin or bending it. Such transformations personalize the coin and make it a lucky token.

In Germany, from Medieval times to the present, it has been said that engraving the SATOR square on a silver plate or a silver coin is useful in putting out fires. One simply throws the coin or plate on the fire and the fire goes out. The SATOR square is a block letters that reads the same up, down, back, and forth. It looks like this:

S A T O R
A R E P O
T E N E T
O P E R A
R O T A S

For another example of how the ancient Roman SATOR square is used in German folk-magic, see the page on John George Hohman's "Pow-Wows or The Long Lost Friend".

The African-American hoodoo tradition employs both dimes and two dollar bills in numerous money-drawing spells, mojo bags, and gambling "hands." The coins may be combined with a John the Conqueror root, a lodestone, sugar, or other ingredients.

According to some folks, a silver "Mercury" dime with a leap-year date (e.g. 1940) is especially propitious. These Mercury dimes do not really depict the Roman god Mercury, according to coin collector John Montierth (jmmontierth@ucdavis.edu) but "even though the coin in question was officially designed as Winged Liberty, everyone looks at it and thinks Mercury." Skip Floyd (SkipFloyd@worldnet.att.net), another coin collector, adds this information: "On March 3, 1916, the U. S. Treasury adopted the Winged Cap design of Adolph A. Weinman from a public competition. Weinman also won the award for the Half Dollar design. Not only is the face not that of Hermes or Mercury, it is NOT MALE. The portrait of Ms. Liberty is of Elsie Stevens, Mrs. Wallace Stevens." All that aside, the common name for this coin is still the Mercury dime, and that's how people who use the coin in conjure work refer to it.

A preference for the Mercury dime rather than another silver coin as a gamblers' charm makes a lot of sense when one recognizes that Mercury was the Roman god who ruled crossroads, games of chance, and sleight of hand tricks -- and as such he was equivalent to the African gambling and crossroads spirit variously called Ellegua, Legba, or Eshu, who had the same domain of influence and was known as the keeper of crossroads. Although the figure engraved on the dime was long ago changed to that of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, many folks still prefer the old-style dime -- one hoodoo man i talked to told me, "You need a Mercury dime to do you any good at all."

The photo above at left (taken by the folklorist Newbell Niles Puckett in 1925) shows one way to wear a silver Mercury dime -- as an anklet. This is both a protective spell and an invitation to luck in games of chance. The photo at right shows the "luckiness" of the coin: It is a little "LUCKY Dime Register Bank" only 2 1/2 inches square and about half an inch high; it counts your dimes as you drop them in, all the way up to $5.00. It dates from the 1930s.

As for why a leap-year date on the coin is luckier than another date, i suspect that it is the rarity or unusualness of a leap-day (one day out of 1461) that recommends the leap-year coin to long-shot gamblers. In making gambling charms, some practitioners combine the leap-year dime with the added unusualness of a two dollar bill, also of a leap-year date, if possible. Again, it is the comparative rarity of this bill that suggests winning against long-shot odds.

The contents of mojo hands vary with the inclinations of their makers, but a typical silver dime gambling charm might consist of a Mercury dime, a small John the Conqueror root, a bit of sugar, and a lucky hand root (a wild orchid root with finger-shaped protrusions that evoke the idea of manual dexterity when playing dice), all wrapped in a leap-year two dollar bill and placed in a red flannel bag. To activate the mojo, its contents would be anointed with some sort of good-luck oil, perhaps red Fast Luck, Three Jacks and a King, or Van Van -- or, as some folks have done, with the urine or menstrual blood of their beloved.

Another hoodoo use for the silver dime is to wear one or at the ankle as a warning device and apotropaic charm: if the coin turns black, an enemy has laid out goofer dust, Hot Foot Powder, or Crossing Powder and you have stepped in it, but it will prove harmless to you. Since formulas for these malicious powders often contain sulphur, which turns silver black on contact, the dime's seemingly magical power is based in practical chemical knowledge. Similarly, a silver dime worn at the throat will turn black is someone tries to poison your food; the dime can also be tested by holding it briefly in the mouth to see if it tarnishes.

Dimes are also used to counteract a curse in hoodoo practice. Typical recipes involve boiling a dime or the filings from its milled edges in water or milk and drinking the liquid to "kill" the effects of occult poisons such as graveyard dirt, goofer dust, rattlesnake eggs, or snake-shed dust,

The following documentation on silver dimes comes from "Hoodoo - Conjuration - Witchcraft - Rootwork," a 5-volume, 4766-page collection of folkloric material gathered by Harry Middleton Hyatt, primarily between 1935 and 1939.

IMPORTANT: If this is the first time you have encountered Hyatt material
at this web site, please take a moment to open and read the supplementary page called
"Hoodoo - Conjuration - Witchcraft - Rootwork" by Harry Middleton Hyatt.


SILVER DIME - LODESTONE - SUGAR - SEW UP IN RED FLANNEL - YOU CAN ALWAYS WIN UNLESS SOMEONE CHEATS

12992. You tie you a piece of -- some sugar, you takes a piece of lodestone, and you put a silver dime in that, you see. And you sew it up. You sew it up in a red piece of flannel. You make it like dat and you carry it in your pocket, but you won't have no luck though if they have the cheat against you. As long as you keep the cheat off you, you have luck.

(What do you mean "have the cheat against you"?)

"Cheat," of course, if you [someone] put down loaded dice or anything, you can't beat it. See, you can't beat anybody that have [loaded dice].

(Oh, they cheat against you.)

Yeah.

(Oh, I see.)

If they cheat, you can't beat a cheat, you see. It won't do no good, you see.

[This theme of 'unless someone cheats" is rare in hoodoo, since it would destroy confidence in "gambling hands."]

[New Orleans, La., (823), 1191:4.]


9 DIMES - BLUESTONE - ALUM - RED FLANNEL BAG: GAMBLE

13000. Take bluestone an' alum an' make a -- an' take nine silver dimes an' sew it up together, an' maybe yo' go, any kind of game yo' play, yo'll win all de money dey have.

(What do you sew that in?)

Red flannel.

[Waycross, Ga. (1134), 1842:9.]


SILVER MONEY - GARLIC - RED FLANNEL: GOOD LUCK

13007. Dey tell me dey take a piece of silver money an' put it in a red sack -- flannel -- an' put a piece of garlic to it an' tote it on yo'. That be fo' good luck.

[Brunswick, {Ga.} 1992:6.]


9 DIMES IN NATION SACK: PROTECTION AND TRADE

13008. {Get} nine silver dimes, file them, {and} wear in {a} nation sack with lodestone for protection and trade. [For the well-known nation sack, private bag worn by women, see interview, THE "NATION SACK" WOMAN, pp. 1449-1459, especially p. 1458, vol. 2]

[Memphis, Tenn., (967), 1564:7]


The blues singer Son House once told an interviewer that his friend the blues singer Robert Johnson "used that silver dime stuff." The interviewer didn't ask what House meant by that, but the implication is obvious: Johnson practiced hoodoo. In "Little Queen of Spades," his paean to a "gambling woman," Johnson sings, "everybody says she's got a mojo." Her mojo may have been a silver dime conjure hand such as those described here. More to the point, spell number 13008 above explains the otherwise cryptic line in Johnson's famous song "Come On in My Kitchen": "I taken the last nickel from her nation sack." A complete account of this special mojo hand or toby only worn by women, appears on the nation sack page.

Order Magic Amulets and Talismans from the
Lucky Mojo Curio Co. Spiritual and Occult Shop:

Mercury-Dime-at-Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company Genuine Silver Mercury Dime (Winged Liberty Dime)
Mercury Dime, minted from 1916 through 1946; the best dime for protection and gambling luck!
$8.00
AMU-USA-DIME

Name of Herb: HIGH JOHN THE CONQUEROR ROOT, WHOLE, SMALL
Use in Magic: Used by many people for the purpose of Drawing LUCK, enjoying Commanding Power, gaining Personal Mastery, and Strengthening Nature.
Small, 1 1/2" max., whole root, for pocket piece, mojo bag. (We also sell John the Conqueror Oil for anointing roots.)
$5.00
BOT-JOH-WRSM

Name of Herb:   LODESTONE GRIT
Use in Magic:     Pea-Gravel-size Lodestones for making oils or mojo bags.
$4.00
MIN-LOD-AGRI

Name of Herb:   LUCKY HAND ROOT, WHOLE, SMALL
Use in Magic:     Among the most powerful ingredients that can be added to an African-American mojo bag designed to increase gambling luck.
Small, 3/4" - 1" long, for use in mojo bag or gambling spell.  (We also sell Lucky Hand Oil for anointing the root; click here for list of Oils.)
$4.00
BOT-LUC-WRSM

Name of Herb:   LUCKY HAND ROOT, WHOLE, LARGE
Use in Magic:     Among the most powerful ingredients that can be added to an African-American mojo bag designed to increase gambling luck.
Large, 1" - 1 1/2" long, for use in mojo bag or gambling spell. (We also sell Lucky Hand Oil for anointing the root; click here for list of Oils.)
$6.00
BOT-LUC-WRLG

Flannel Bags for making a Mojo Bag or Conjure Hand 2" x 3"
RED FLANNEL for GOOD LUCK, GAMBLING, and LOVE-DRAWING
Drawstring bags folks want when fixing up mojo hands. Hand-made in the USA.          
$2.00
BAG-USA-MORE

Name of Herb:   BLUEING: MEXICAN BLUE ANIL BALLS
Use in Magic:     A solid blueing compound used for good luck, purification, and uncrossing. Recommended as a safe substitute for toxic bluestone (copper sulphate). Packet with full instructions.
$4.00
BLU-BAL-PK07

Name of Herb:   ALUM CHUNK  
Use in Magic:     For stopping gossip and for other protective and cleansing purposes.
$4.00
MIN-ALU-CHUN

Name of Herb:    GARLIC CLOVES (AJO JAPONES)
Use in Magic:      Protective, powerful, and edible; used in cooking and to repel all manner of evil.
$3.00
HER-GAR-CLOV

Pookline-for-the-Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-in-Forestville-California

Search All Lucky Mojo and Affiliated Sites!

You can search our sites for a single word (like archaeoastronomy, hoodoo, conjure, or clitoris), an exact phrase contained within quote marks (like "love spells", "spiritual supplies", "occult shop", "gambling luck", "Lucky Mojo bag", or "guardian angel"), or a name within quote marks (like "Blind Willie McTell", "Black Hawk", "Hoyt's Cologne", or "Frank Stokes"):
Pookline-for-the-Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-in-Forestville-California

Contact-the-Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-in-Forestville-California copyright © 1994-2014 catherine yronwode. All rights reserved.
Send your comments to:cat yronwode.
Did you like what you read here? Find it useful?
Then please click on the Paypal Secure Server logo and make a small
donation to catherine yronwode for the creation and maintenance of this site.

Pookline-for-the-Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-in-Forestville-California

Sponsor-Icon-for-the-Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-in-Forestville-California

Pookline-for-the-Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-in-Forestville-California

Good-Luck-Icon-for-Lucky-W-Amulet-Archive-by-catherine-yronwode

LUCKY MOJO is a large domain that is organized into a number of
interlinked web sites, each with its own distinctive theme and look.
You are currently reading

THE LUCKY W AMULET ARCHIVE by cat yronwode.

Here are some other LUCKY MOJO web sites you can visit:

OCCULTISM, MAGIC SPELLS, MYSTICISM, RELIGION, SYMBOLISM
Hoodoo in Theory and Practice by cat yronwode: an introduction to African-American rootwork
Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic by cat yronwode: a materia magica of African-American conjure
Lucky W Amulet Archive by cat yronwode: an online museum of worldwide talismans and charms
Sacred Sex: essays and articles on tantra yoga, neo-tantra, karezza, sex magic, and sex worship
Sacred Landscape: essays and articles on archaeoastronomy and sacred geometry
Freemasonry for Women by cat yronwode: a history of mixed-gender Freemasonic lodges
The Lucky Mojo Esoteric Archive: captured internet text files on occult and spiritual topics
Lucky Mojo Usenet FAQ Archive: FAQs and REFs for occult and magical usenet newsgroups
Aleister Crowley Text Archive: a multitude of texts by an early 20th century occultist
Lucky Mojo Magic Spells Archives: love spells, money spells, luck spells, protection spells, and more
      Free Love Spell Archive: love spells, attraction spells, sex magick, romance spells, and lust spells
      Free Money Spell Archive: money spells, prosperity spells, and wealth spells for job and business
      Free Protection Spell Archive: protection spells against witchcraft, jinxes, hexes, and the evil eye
      Free Gambling Luck Spell Archive: lucky gambling spells for the lottery, casinos, and races

POPULAR CULTURE
Hoodoo and Blues Lyrics: transcriptions of blues songs about African-American folk magic
EaRhEaD!'S Syd Barrett Lyrics Site: lyrics by the founder of the Pink Floyd Sound
The Lesser Book of the Vishanti: Dr. Strange Comics as a magical system, by cat yronwode
The Spirit Checklist: a 1940s newspaper comic book by Will Eisner, indexed by cat yronwode
Fit to Print: collected weekly columns about comics and pop culture by cat yronwode
Eclipse Comics Index: a list of all Eclipse comics, albums, and trading cards

EDUCATION AND OUTREACH
Hoodoo Rootwork Correspondence Course with cat yronwode: 52 weekly lessons in book form
Hoodoo Conjure Training Workshops: hands-on rootwork classes, lectures, and seminars
Lucky Mojo Community Forum: an online message board for our occult spiritual shop customers
Lucky Mojo Hoodoo Rootwork Hour Radio Show: learn free magic spells via podcast download
Lucky Mojo Videos: see video tours of the Lucky Mojo shop and get a glimpse of the spirit train
Lucky Mojo Newsletter Archive: subscribe and receive discount coupons and free magick spells
Follow Us on Facebook: get company news and product updates as a Lucky Mojo Facebook Fan

ONLINE SHOPPING
The Lucky Mojo Curio Co.: spiritual supplies for hoodoo, magick, witchcraft, and conjure
Lucky Mojo Publishing: books on magic with herbs, roots and candles, sugar spells, bone divination, and more!
Herb Magic: complete line of Lucky Mojo Herbs, Minerals, and Zoological Curios, with sample spells
Mystic Tea Room Gift Shop: antique, vintage, and contemporary fortune telling tea cups

PERSONAL SITES
catherine yronwode: the eclectic and eccentric author of many of the above web pages
nagasiva yronwode: tyaginator, nigris (333), nocTifer, lorax666, boboroshi, Troll, !
Garden of Joy Blues: former 80 acre hippie commune near Birch Tree in the Missouri Ozarks
Liselotte Erlanger Glozer: illustrated articles on collectible vintage postcards
Jackie Payne: Shades of Blues: a San Francisco Bay Area blues singer

ADMINISTRATIVE
Lucky Mojo Site Map: the home page for the whole Lucky Mojo electron-pile
All the Pages: descriptive named links to about 1,000 top-level Lucky Mojo web pages
How to Contact Us: we welcome feedback and suggestions regarding maintenance of this site
Make a Donation: please send us a small Paypal donation to keep us in bandwidth and macs!

OTHER SITES OF INTEREST
Arcane Archive: thousands of archived Usenet posts on religion, magic, spell-casting, mysticism, and spirituality
Association of Independent Readers and Rootworkers: psychic reading, conjure, and hoodoo root doctor services
Candle Ministry: Missionary Independent Spiritual Church deacons will set lights for your petitions and prayers
Candles and Curios: essays and articles on traditional African American conjure and folk magic, plus shopping
Crystal Silence League: online prayer request network; upload your prayers here and pray for the welfare of others
Gospel of Satan: the story of Jesus and the angels, from the perspective of the God of this World
Hoodoo Psychics: connect online or call 1-888-4-HOODOO for instant readings now from a member of AIRR
Missionary Independent Spiritual Church: spirit-led, inter-faith; prayer-light services; Smallest Church in the World
Mystic Tea Room: tea leaf reading, teacup divination, and a museum of antique fortune telling cups
Satan Service: an archive presenting the theory, practice, and history of Satanism and Satanists
Southern Spirits: 19th and 20th century accounts of hoodoo, including ex-slave narratives & interviews
Spiritual Spells: lessons in folk magic and spell casting from an eclectic Wiccan perspective, plus shopping
Yronwode Home: personal pages of catherine yronwode and nagasiva yronwode, magical archivists
Yronwode Institution: the Yronwode Institution for the Preservation and Popularization of Indigenous Ethnomagicology

Pookline-for-the-Lucky-Mojo-Curio-Company-in-Forestville-California